Clayton Bay Camp

 

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The Clayton Bay camp is a purpose built children's holiday and aquatic adventure camp built on a 5 hectare (12 acre) property with direct frontage to Lake Alexandrina at Clayton Bay, approx 90 Kilometres South of Adelaide.

The camp comprises live-in accommodation for 70 children and staff with a large activities building, a dining hall, with adjoining kitchen, five separate bunk rooms, an adjacent shower and toilet block, and another six brick bunkhouses.

The camp is used to conduct therapeutic recovery and adventure programmes for traumatised children separated from their birth parents and living in care, as well as specialised adventure and therapeutic activities for disabled children and other children in government care.

Sporting equipment consists of canoes, sailing boats, paddle boats, bicycles and a playground.

How does the Clayton Bay Camp operate?

As SOS Australia has no office and no staff, the day to day operations of the camp are run by our 'partner' charity - Puddle Jumpers Incorporated. Puddle Jumpers is an independent and separate charitable entity but the operational and management link has been established by having a common Chairman (Ellis Wayland). Adherence to the strict operating principles of SOS International is ensured through this joint chairmanship.

This strategy has been an outstanding success, attracting corporate sponsorships and the support of many small businesses throughout Australia.

Sadly, there are more than 43,000  children in Australia who have been separated from their birth parents because of parental neglect and/or physical and sexual abuse. The 'theme' of SOS/Puddle Jumpers operations is to encourage such traumatised and troubled children to face up to their problems ('puddles') and to 'jump' over them, so that they can enjoy their childhood and develop their lives to achieve their personal goals in life.

Our Achievements

  • Severely traumatised children who have attended our camps have undergone quite amazing rehabilitation experiences
  • Disabled children have been able to have an adventure experience and fun with their peers of a type previously denied to them
  • Sibling groups split by separate placements have been reunited - this is a very important program, not provided by any other agency.
  • Grandchildren in the permanent care of their grandparents have enjoyed an adventure and respite experience giving them the chance to develop peer relationship with children sharing the same experiences.
  • The camps have been the catalyst for the recruitment of 400 young volunteers whose work with the children on camps has been nothing less than inspirational. Many of these young people, mostly still in their teens, tell us that their experiences at the Clayton Bay Camp have been their most rewarding in their lives so far.

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